Category Archives: Development

Jetboard Joust Devlog #84 – Along Came A Spider…

I’m pretty resigned to the fact that these bosses are going to take me ages now, and the fact that I’ve finally come to this realisation weirdly makes the process of creating them considerably easier to deal with. Also I think I’ve made all the edits that the code needs to cope with enemies with multiple ‘hit spots’ and the like so I’m no longer having to go back and rework old code, this alone makes the process considerably less frustrating.

So, whilst this one took me knocking on six days and was still really hard work it felt like the easiest of the lot. I think a large contributing factor to this was the fact that the art came together really quickly (I was done in just over a day) and I feel much more in my comfort zone when I’m coding rather than pushing pixels.

I based the spider’s head and abdomen on ‘real’ reference material, though I also referenced much more stylised representations. I took the layout and proportion of the legs from a robot spider image I found somewhere on the net but changed the look and feel completely to fit in with the overall game style.

Animating the legs, mandibles and abdomen was done in code. This wasn’t difficult but was extremely time consuming as there’s so many moving parts (24 leg sections) which, as MonoGame is pretty ‘raw’, all have to be lined up and connected manually by working out pixel grid references and such. This is a pain in the arse – I guess engines like Unity and Unreal have ‘drag and drop’ tools that make this type of process much easier but generally I don’t like the bloat and overhead that comes with those types of tools and prefer the fact that MonoGame is pretty low level.

I’m calling this enemy the ‘spinner’ and it has three attack phases…

Stage One
In this stage the spinner is attached by a web strand to the top of the screen. It tracks the player very fast horizontally when in its ‘retracted’ state or attempts to divebomb the player when the player moves beneath it. This is the only way to get it to expose it’s fleshy, pulsating abdomen which must be destroyed in order to move to the next stage. When it hits the ground after a divebomb attack it spits out a burst of fireballs.

Stage Two
With its abdomen destroyed the spinner detaches from its web and begins to chase the player very aggressively. At regular intervals it will fire off bursts of a triple laser beam. In order to move to the next stage the player must shoot off all of its legs – its head and body are invulnerable until this happens.

Stage Three
Now legless, the spinner alternates between a mad spin attack in which it fires off a single laser at increasing speed, and a kamikaze style attack where it attempts to ram the player (its mandibles do a lot of damage). All of its body parts are now vulnerable to attack.

Generally I’m really pleased with this boss. There’s still something about the ‘lightbulb’ on its abdomen in stages two and three I’m not sure about so I may rework this but generally I think all the attacks are working pretty well, just need to be balanced in-game properly. I even had some time to add some custom audio for the lasers and fireballs, still need to go back and add this for the other bosses.

And I still need to add boss-sized bones and explosions!

Dev Time: 6 days
Total Dev Time: approx 185 days

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The Final Art With All 24 Moving Leg Joints

Battling The Spinner – All Attack Stages In Action

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Jetboard Joust Devlog #83 – Somethin’ Fishy Goin’ On…

God, these big enemies are hard!

I thought six days on the last one was extreme but this one has taken me pretty much eight full days. Probably over 50% of that time spent on the art. Basically these have pretty much morphed into ‘miniboss’ type creatures with multiple attack patterns (and in this case even spawning smaller enemies) which was never my intention but I feel like I have to kind of go with the flow. I am really struggling with motivation now though, this project is dragging on and on and ON and to be spending so much time on one thing at this late stage is extremely demoralising. I need to be earn some sodding money. Enough of my moaning though…

I decided to make this enemy a giant deep sea fish as deep sea creatures are weird, alien and creepy looking and have already been used for inspiration on some of the other enemies such as the squocket. My main source of inspiration was a fish called the fangtooth which seemed to have the right balance between looking weird and dangerous whilst maintaining an iconic fishy shape. I’m calling it the ‘snapper’.

Creating the basic shape in pixelart wasn’t too difficult and I didn’t go down nearly as many dead-ends as I did with the stinger so the process, whilst just as time-consuming, wasn’t nearly as frustrating. Most of the time I always felt like I was making progress. The scales were the hardest part to get right – it’s large area to cover and it’s tough to get the balance right. Not enough detail and things look flat and boring, too much detail and things look too ‘photographic’ and don’t gel with the rest of the game’s style. When the scales were defined as a simple filled pattern they looked too ‘flat’, like I’d obviously filled a stencilled area. If I applied too much shading to them they almost looked too ‘3D’ and ‘realistic’. In the end I offset the scales based on a pattern of concentric circles to give a slightly rounder shape to the body, limited myself to three different scale tones and didn’t allow a change of tone within an individual scale. This took forever but it finally seemed to give me the right degree of detail whilst maintaining a sense of stylised simplicity.

I thought the teeth and gills would be hard to draw but actually those parts came together really quickly, as did the ‘skull’ for the zombie attack phase. The spikes on the spine were rather more finicky and still need a bit of tidying up.

The other reason this took so long was that collision detection on an enemy of this size gets rather more complex. When I began work on the game I didn’t have ‘boss’ type enemies in mind so assumed I could implement a simple ‘one size fits all’ collision detection system. Unfortunately this doesn’t cut it when you have enemies that are complex shapes, some areas that act as ‘hot spots’ for damage, and other areas that you may want to collide with the player but not actually take damage themselves. I needed to find a way to allow for all this whilst avoiding having to go back and redo old code (particularly checking all the weapons again).

In the end I came up with a ‘CollisionProxy’ class. A CollisionProxy is spawned from a parent (the main sprite) and will both take and inflict damage on behalf of its parent (or not depending on the configuration). It also renders with a custom shader in sync with its parent when taking damage. Any sprite can have any number of proxies. So far this system seems to work well and I’ve hardly had to change any of my core code to implement it.

There’s also polygon-based collision detection on this enemy. Up until now I have been able to get away with simple rectangle-based collision detection. Thankfully I had already implemented SAT-based collision detection for convex polygons when I first ported my game engine to MonoGame so I had no extra work to do there – Thank God!! I think trying to add something like that at this stage would probably have killed me!

In its final(?) incarnation the snapper has three attack phases…

Stage One
Tracks the player fairly slowly. Unleashes either an aggressive charge/snap attack or spawns electric jellyfish from its mouth. Its jaws do more damage than the rest of its body and it will only take damage if you fire directly into its mouth (this was a PITA to implement collision-wise).

Stage Two
Loses its flesh and becomes a steampunk zombie fish. In this mode tracking of the player is faster and it’s two mounted ‘shredder‘ weapons are armed and fully dangerous. You need to destroy the engine mounted on its side to proceed to the next phase.

Stage Three
Now on its last legs (if it had any) the snapper tracks the player very quickly. It’s only defence at this point is a very aggressive kamikaze charge attack.

And that, at last, is it. Painful, but I think it was probably worth it. I’ve had some of the best feedback for the game so far from some of these images on Twitter. There’s still a few things I’m not 100% happy with. Art-wise the final phase needs some more engineering where the engine used to be and I might try getting rid of the eyeball on the zombie skull and replacing with a more skull-like eye socket. The second phase is also a bit weird – at the moment the whole enemy can take damage but it recharges until the engine is destroyed (so there’s a separate health meter for the engine). This is confusing. I should probably have the main enemy not take damage at this point and only have a health meter for the engine.

The difficulty will need some tweaking but I’ll have to do that in the context of the game more. Generally, I must admit, I am not a big fan of boss fights as they are often done so badly. In my opinion a good boss fight should seem ridiculously tough at first but be relatively straightforward once you’ve worked out a strategy. You shouldn’t die before you’ve even had a chance to get a decent look at the boss and it shouldn’t be a schlep to get there on every retry either. Though I thoroughly enjoyed both Dark Souls and Demon Souls to the point of obsession I found the ‘rinse and repeat’ style run to the bosses immensely tedious. I gave up at the final boss on both games because of this – life was simply too short! The bosses in this game will be optional and protect hefty rewards/upgrades rather than blocking your progress in the game.

I also still need to add some larger explosions befitting an enemy of this size!!

Dev Time: 8 days
Total Dev Time: approx 179 days

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Fours Days Of Pixel-Pushing In Fifteen Seconds

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Fun With Collision Proxies

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Entering The Zombie Phase

Whoops – I Accidentally Added Boss Battles!

Jetboard Joust Devlog #81 – On A Roll!

In the late 1970s, when kids played with proper toys rather than tablets and smartphones, there was this marvellous toy called ‘BigTrak‘. I always wanted one, but they were way too expensive to buy and probably cost around £10k per year in batteries. I’m sure the reason there’s so many SUVs on the roads today is that all these 40-something-yr-old men are buying them as some kind of mid-life BigTrak substitute. I still think the BigTrak design looks pretty cool even today.

This enemy, the ‘crawler’, was very much inspired by BigTrak, but it wasn’t just a nod to seventies nostalgia. At the moment gameplay seems to gravitate very much towards the top of the screen and I wanted something other than pickups to take the player closer to the ground and amongst the buildings. A ground-based enemy seemed the logical choice to do this.

Usually I’d work on the art first but in this case I thought I’d run a few code tests first to see if the ‘tank’ type enemy I had planned had any kind of hope of succeeding. Maths is not my strong point, and as this vehicle would have to perform the impossible feat of traversing vertical slopes and 90° changes of gradient I needed to make sure it wasn’t going to look like arse before I wasted loads of time on the art.

To my surprise my initial tests worked very well. There’s no ‘physics’ at play here, the wheels (working independently) simply traverse the outer edge of the terrain in the most basic way. I then work out the angle between the wheels (i.e. the axle) and place and orientate the chassis based on this. It’s not physically ‘correct’ by any means as the distance between the wheels changes depending on the terrain but, as it’s performing impossible feats anyway, I didn’t think this mattered – I could get away with a telescopic axle! In the final version I added something to make the wheels roll more nicely around corners but other than that I stuck with my first approach, I made a couple of attempts to make things more ‘realistic’ but both ended up looking worse than the original.

Satisfied that I could make this work I then began work on the art. There were two keys things I had to bear in mind here. Firstly, the design needed to be such that the distance between the wheels could change without looking ridiculous as described above, and secondly that the vehicle could travel in either direction. I think you can get away with simply flipping sprites for left/right when they’re small but with larger sprites like this that approach can look pretty ropey.

At first I was working on a ‘tank’ type idea that was similar to BigTrak. I spent several hours on this but wasn’t happy with anything I came up with. Everything looked too clunky or too much like a motorbike. So I started experimenting with some radical changes and in the ended settled on a kind of armoured ‘push me/pull you’ design that I felt worked much better. It’s a complex affair though, the final unit comprises eleven different sprites, so getting these all lined up and positioned correctly was a very fiddly business!

Getting the guns to track the player was also fairly tortuous as one has to consider the rotation of the vehicle as well as the previous rotation of the gun to make things work smoothly. People with more of a maths brain probably find this stuff easy. I don’t, but I got there in the end.

The AI wasn’t simple either. For individual vehicles it’s pretty straightforward, but when they appeared in batches I was getting issues (as with the Squocket enemy) of them overlapping too much. In the end I created a ‘hive mind’ class that acts as a controller for a bunch of vehicles. This class works out the ideal positioning of each vehicle and then the individual vehicles track to this position.

Lastly I have the pilots of the vehicle man jetboards and make a last-ditch attempt to attack the player when their vehicle is destroyed. There’s a specific class for this type of enemy too (I’m calling it the Kamikaze) but it’s pretty much one of the basic minions with tweaked parameters.

EDIT: Aaarggh – I thought I was done but whilst working on some screengrabs for this post I ran into a hideous bug to do with the world wrapping (remember I talked about that here?). I was getting all sorts of problems caused by the vehicle wrapping at a different time to any of the buildings it was in contact with. Very difficult to find a solution for this so in the end I’ve settled on a bit of a hack whereby the vehicle stops moving if it’s very close to the edge of the world. This seems to work OK and I don’t think it will be too obvious in practice.

So, the most complex enemy to date but I’m pleased with the end result. I think I only really need a couple more like this and I can move on…

Dev Time: 4 days
Total Dev Time: approx 166 days

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Abandoned Art Direction – ‘Tank’

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The Finished Design – ‘Push Me/Pull You’

Guns Tracking Player And A Nicer Rolling Action Round Corners


Using A Variety Of Weapons To Dispatch Two Crawlers (Enlarged 150%)

Jetboard Joust Devlog #79 – Space Invaders

In my last post I wrote about maybe recycling the old ‘Evil Mother’ enemy into something based on the classic ‘Space Invaders‘ aliens, and that’s exactly what I’ve ended up doing!

I like the idea of including a few homages to the classic arcade shooters of yesteryear in Jetboard Joust, and as ‘Space Invaders’ was really the granddaddy of them all it’s an obvious choice. I wasn’t sure whether the formation/movement of the invaders would work within the horizontal/scrolling format of Jetboard Joust but, with a few tweaks, it actually seemed to work out pretty well.

It wasn’t too tricky to code either. I was worried that get the whole batch of invaders to move together around buildings and stuff would be a pain but it was pretty straightforward in the end.

What I do is move all the invaders as a batch rather than treating them as individual sprites. Collision detections are still handled individually and, when an invader collides with a building, it sends a message back to the batch telling it to change direction. When the batch is initiated I make sure it doesn’t take up more vertical space than the space between the highest building and the top of the screen so I know it’s never going to get stuck.

Probably the trickiest thing was deciding how to treat a batch of invaders when attacked by the ‘Gravity Hammer‘ weapon. Moving the whole batch at once would just look dumb so I needed a way of having individual enemies break formation when hammered and then return to the appropriate position once they recover.

To achieve this I have a property for each invader that stores its location within the batch separate from its position on screen. If the invader is forced to break formation it is relatively simple for it to return to its batch position. Though it wasn’t strictly necessary I also decided to have individual invaders track horizontally with the batch even when hammered (so only their vertical position is displaced). It just seemed to look better this way.

In keeping with the original I have the invader’s speed and rate of fire increase as individual invaders are destroyed.

Dev Time: 1 day
Total Dev Time: approx 160 days

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Admit It – You’ve Always Wanted To Play ‘Space Invaders’ With A Flamethrower!

Using The Plasma Rifle To Dispense With A Batch Of Invaders


Jetboard Joust Devlog #78 – Return of the Evil Mothers

Too long since the last update. Had a lot of shit on – decided to fight a parking ticket issued by one of those fascist private parking companies and it ended up in court. I beat the tossers but it took so much time preparing the defence and everything I’m not sure if it was worth it, just did it on principle really as I don’t like scammers or bullies. Turns out these scumbags didn’t even have the right to operate on the land on which the ticket was issued in the first place!

Anyway, back on topic, the first major ‘new’ enemy is actually an ‘old’ enemy redone, but I don’t think there’s any shame in that. If you’ve been following this for some time you may remember the ‘Evil Mother‘ enemy. Well, I’d come to the conclusion that this enemy just wasn’t big enough and would work better (and make more sense) as some kind of mini mothership that spilled out its occupants when destroyed.

So I spent quite some time designing a kind of ‘bathysphere’ type craft. It’s actually several different sprites in one, the ship itself, the pilot, the ‘antennae’ on the top which acts as a weapon, plus the various lights. I’m pretty pleased with the result though a little worried it looks a bit too ‘2D’ and could do with some more shading or something to make it appear more ’rounded’.

I also increased the size of the enemies that spill out when the craft is destroyed and spent quite some time working on a much improved bullet that tracks the player’s movement in a similar way to the Limpet Mine. There’s also a ‘tell’ that the ship is going to fire as you can see the antennae at the top charging up.

The shaking effect is achieved by applying an offset to the ships position each frame. These offsets are always evenly distributed and chosen at random so it’s a very predictable type of brownian motion.

I think I’m going to use the original enemy design as more of a ‘swarm’ type enemy with a movement type that’s an homage to the original Space Invaders!

Dev Time: 3 days
Total Dev Time: approx 159 days

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Jetboard Joust Devlog #71 – (Black) Hole In One!

This was the first weapon that I really didn’t have much of a clue what I was going for when I started it and, ironically, it’s probably turned out to be the one I’m most pleased with!

When I set up the placeholder for this one ages ago it was called ‘Storm Bringer’ and I had an idea it was going to involve some kind of ‘particle storm’ type effect, a bit like those fireworks you get that fire out a ton of different sparks that go off in different directions.

However, I’ve already changed the ‘Spreader‘ weapon to be called ‘Particle Storm’ and, as that now does something very similar to what I intended this weapon to do, differentiating this weapon proved difficult.

I tried a series of variations with a bunch of particles moving in a constrained and stuttery ‘Brownian Motion’ type manner but this all looked shite and, to be honest, given that I’ve done so many of these weapons now I was beginning to feel like I was running out of ideas and motivation.

Then came a random source of inspiration. In my very skunkworks home studio I have a rack for audio gear that I’ve cobbled together over the years from various shitty pieces of Ikea furniture and stuff. In an attempt to make this more uniform (as nothing matched and my workmanship was so terrible) I covered the entire piece with Jack Kirby art from a bunch of old Spiderman and Fantastic Four comics I had as a kid.

On one small section of this there’s an image of a character disappearing into a kind of black hole, the image is drawn in negative and looks really striking. I had vaguely considered a weapon called ‘Black Hole’ (though I was worried it would be too similar to the ‘Sonic Boom‘) so I decided, largely out of desperation, to try switching the particles I was using to very dark circles with a light outline. I thought this would look ridiculous but, to my surprise, it actually looked kind of cool!

It’s not a single black hole though, so I hit upon the concept of a weapon that fires a series of mini black holes that suck the life force from enemies. Stephen Hawking would probably turn in his grave but I liked the idea. I’m calling it the ‘Black Hole Blaster’ which, thankfully, just about fits in the space I’ve reserved for weapon names in the HUD!

I worked on this ‘negative space’ effect some more, adding a layering system to my particle code so that I could draw all the white outlines ‘behind’ the black circles, this gave the effect of a unified black mass with a white outline which looked much better than a bunch of circles overlaid. As usual there was a lot of tweaking and messing around here (I didn’t really have any point of reference for the effect I was trying to create other than that one comicbook panel) but I’ve ended up with something I think works.

There’s five layers of particles in the final version two sets of black circles with light outlines (one smaller than the other) and the concentric circles you see overlaid which (I think) help to give the impression of some kind of black hole rather than simply black smoke. It was difficult to get these concentric circles subtle enough to suggest ‘black hole’ without overwhelming things, I had to do a lot of messing around with the frequency and distribution of them. It’s possible that I’ve erred to much on the side of caution and could do with a few more of them. It does look a bit like some kind of weird satanic flamethrower but I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing!

Lastly, whilst working on the collision detection (which was very straightforward) I thought it might be a nice touch if these mini black holes exerted a small gravitational force, actually sucking enemies towards them. This was pretty fiddly to code, and my initial version was ludicrously powerful, but it did seem to work and help to differentiate this weapon nicely from some of the others.

So I think I’m pretty much done with this one now. I’m really pleased with it, both in the way it looks, but also for the fact I’ve never seen a weapon quite like it in any other game (though some smartarse will no doubt point one out to me)!

Only two weapons left to go!!

Dev Time: 2 days
Total Dev Time: approx 140.5 days

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The Jack Kirby Panel That became My Inspiration

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An Early Draft Of The Weapon

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The Final(ish) Version

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Too Much Suction!

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Black Hole Dogfight!

Jetboard Joust Devlog #69 – Boom Boom, Shake The Room!

This latest weapon is called the ‘Sonic Boom’ and I had a fairly good idea of what I wanted it to look like visually before I started. Something akin to radiating circles but not so regular in feel.

I remember seeing something as a kid in a book about optical illusions (we had no Internet then, kids) that always stuck with me – it was an image comprised of two sets of concentric circles, the centres of which were slightly offset. It made your eyes go funny and that was a good thing.

So I started on that basis, by updating the geometry shaders I discuss here to include multiple sets of shapes that are offset by a certain amount. It took quite a while to get this working in a way I was happy with (and to structure the HLSL in a way that was sensible and would allow me to add other shape types easily), but the result was pretty satisfying if nothing like the effect I set out trying to achieve!

I realised there was just too much being drawn in the shader so I set about adding some different paint modes to vary the effect created. As well as the original ‘OR’ logic (if a pixel contains a shape it’s drawn) I added AND, XOR and NOT modes that react differently, particularly where shapes overlap. For the AND and NOT modes I allow a number of overlaps to be specified, with AND any pixel that contains >= the number of overlaps is drawn, with NOT and pixel that contains < the number of overlaps is drawn.

By combining these modes and a lot (and I mean a lot) of tweaking I was finally able to achieve the type of effect I'd set out to create. The final version consists of two overlapping geometry shaders for the bulk of the effect, particles around the barrel of the weapon, and a smaller 'negative' geometry shader also around the barrel of the weapon.

As with most of these weapons, the actual mechanics of it were pretty straightforward to program. It acts really like a kind of RPG that must be 'charged' before being released, if anything it's even simpler than the RPG because I'm allowing this one to travel through buildings (I'm not sure if I'll keep it like that or not, it does seem a little weird).

I did also have to update the enemy AI to allow them to cope with a 'charge and hold' type weapon but that was pretty easy. The audio design for this one's gonna be fun!

Dev Time: 2 days
Total Dev Time: approx 136.5 days

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First Stab At Updated Geometry Shader

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Adding Different Paint Modes To The Geometry Shader

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The Final Sonic Boom Effect

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Adjusting Enemy AI For ‘Charge And Hold’

Jetboard Joust Devlog #68 – Ray Of Hope!

I felt the latest weapon deserved a post to itself as it took a bit longer than the others and I’m particularly pleased with the result.

It’s called the ‘Gamma Ray’ and I was deliberately going for a kind of retro 50s sci-fi vibe with it. As with the bulk of the weapons (probably more so), there’s actually very little to coding the mechanics of it – probably around 90% of the development time here was spent on the visuals.

The ‘ray’ effect is all created with a custom shader. At its heart it’s an approximated sine wave (calculated using the smoothstep algorithm) – to get it looking more ‘electric’ I vary the amplitude of the wave at random each cycle.

I had a lot of issues finding a technique for generating random numbers in HLSL that I was happy with. I tried out a couple of algorithmic solutions but none of these seemed to look much good to me. In the end I used a second texture as a ‘noise’ lookup table, I created this texture myself by rendering to a RenderTarget2D in MonoGame so I could be sure the ‘noise’ was perfectly distributed. I’ll probably write a simple tutorial post on this subject and include some PNGs with different type of randomness.

I didn’t like using a consistent wavelength for the shader as it seemed to make things too uniform so I tried varying the wavelength per frame. This looked much better but I ran into an issue where the ‘end’ of the ray looked weird if it didn’t taper out to a point, which it wouldn’t do when there wasn’t an exact number of wave cycles across the length of ray.

I tried fading out the end to get around this – this worked OK but not great and looked weird when the ray ‘collided’ with enemies or buildings. In the end I settled on a solution whereby I taper out both the amplitude and ‘stroke width’ of the wave to zero, this seems to work fine and, even with a fractional amount of cycles, the ray now always tapers out to a nice point!

Lastly I applied a raster effect to the wave (again in HLSL) and overlaid two different rays with wavelengths cycling at different rates. The wavelength of both waves in tweened using a ‘Bounce’ tween algorithm so it seems to cycle regularly but in a fairly non-linear fashion.

The concentric circles at the muzzle of the gun and at the point the ray hits something are created using the geometric shaders I discuss here, though I’ve added a raster effect and a gradual fade out.

Dev Time: 2 days
Total Dev Time: approx 134.5 days

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One Of The First Drafts Of The Raygun Shader

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The Finished Raygun Effect

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The Gamma Ray In Action

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Gamma Ray vs Particle Storm

Jetboard Joust Devlog #67 – Finger On The Pulse

Started on the more space-age weapons this week! Got three done which isn’t bad going I guess, I would have liked to get started on another but, as you’ll see below, I wasn’t happy with one of these and decided to start again from scratch.

I also made a couple of changes to my particle system, the main one was adding the ability to align particles left, right, up or down when they’re drawn. This has added a great deal of flexibility in designing the various particle fx which has been the bulk of the work here.

Plasma Rifle
I wanted the first weapon to be pretty close to the feel of the player’s weapon in Defender or Jet Pac (which was probably based on Defender anyway). The actual logic here is pretty simple, a beam is fired and the ‘back’ of the beam moves at a slower rate to the front. Tweaking the particle fx is what took the time and there are three different particle states here, one for the ‘head’ of the beam, one for the ‘tail’, and one for the rings that are formed around it.

I also went through several iterations of the explosion at the end of the beam, going through a bunch of ideas that looked decent but too ‘geometric’ before settling on the version you see here.

Originally I was just performing collision detection for the ‘head’ of the beam but I found this looked a bit weird when enemies moved into the tail and nothing happened to them. Now I also check to see if an enemy has moved into the tail of the beam and apply a smaller amount of damage if they have (based on the theoretical strength of the beam at that point).

Pulse Cannon
I have very fond memories of the two Turok shooters on N64 and my ‘Pulse Cannon’ is somewhat inspired by the ‘Pulse Rifle‘ in those games. It fires rapid bursts of energy with a short delay between each burst.

The mechanics of this weapon were very simple as it’s just basic projectiles moving in a straight line. Again, what took the time was getting the visuals right. here I have a sprite for the centre of the ‘pulse’ and three different particle generators, one for the ring around the pulse and two for its trail.

Spreader
The last of this batch of weapons was originally going to be based on the ‘triple blaster’ found in a bunch of ‘bullet hell’ style 2D SHMUPs. I spent almost a day going down this path and tweaking some ok looking ‘fireball’ style projectiles (well, the particles are OK, the sprites in front looking pretty lame) but, when the weapon was finally done, I was left feeling rather disappointed with the result. It just seemed rather bland and lacked anything to differentiate it from the other projectile-based weapons in the game (of which there are many).

So I went back to the drawing-board and instead engineered a weapon that creates an expanding field of energy. Even after about an hour of experimenting I could tell that this was going to be much more effective, and it was. Of course it took a long time tweaking the particles again but there’s only two different generators here so less than the previous two weapons.

I didn’t like the energy field just fading out at full ‘spread’ as I felt this looked a bit weird, so instead I made it contract back to a point which seemed to look pretty cool. The damage done by the field of energy is based on how much of the enemy overlaps the field and how concentrated the field is at that point, focussing the field at the end therefore also has implications in the use of the weapon as it means that damage done is super-concentrated at that point.

I’ll probably re-use the original ‘spreader’ bullets for a bespoke enemy weapon or something later in the game. I suspect I haven’t given up tweaking some of these effects either, particularly the plasma rifle – I like it but there’s still something that’s not quite sitting right with me. I think I may like my original version better in some respects.

Also, ‘spreader’ is a bit of a shite name for a weapon. Sound more like something you use to plaster walls or make a toasted sandwich. Must think of something better.

Dev Time: 4 days
Total Dev Time: approx 132.5 days

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The Original Plasma Rifle


The Current Plasma Rifle

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The Pulse Cannon

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The Original (Shit) Spreader

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The Reworked Spreader

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Some Gratuitous Action With The New Weapons

Jetboard Joust Devlog #66 – Out With A Bang!

Well, all the major coding on the conventional weapons is now done so there’s just a few bits and bobs before I move on to the more ‘futuristic’ weapon set.

Firstly, I had to design upgrade UI icons for the weapons I’ve added over the past few weeks. These are 32×32 icons so require more detail than the in-game sprites. I was pretty much a #pixelart noob before starting this game and don’t find this type of drawing easy, one of the reasons I went with a limited colour palette (other than liking the ‘gameboy meets spectrum’ aesthetic) was that it would considerably narrow down my options when it came to the art and thus make the drawing considerably less intimidating. I think that was a good move.

You can see the final icons here – I’m not sure, in retrospect, that a square format was the best format to choose for these as many weapons are much more ‘landscape’ in shape – particularly things like R.P.G.s, making them tough to fit in that space without them looking too spindly and weak.

The other major thing to do was add audio for the new weapons. As with the rest on the in-game FX, I designed all the sounds using the DSI Tempest. I stick mainly to the analog oscillators but also use the digital oscs for noise and (sometimes) a pure sine wave. I really love the Tempest for this type of sound design work, the eight-slot mod matrix makes it incredibly flexible, yet it’s really intuitive to use for a synth that’s so deep. Yeah, there’s a couple of things I really wish it had from a sound design perspective (individual level control over each analog osc and pre/post filter as a modulation target) but overall it’s a beast with just the right balance of flexibility and limitations.

I also used my cheapo Boss RV-100 ‘retro’ digital reverb unit and a couple of plug-ins for (sometimes fairly hardcore) compression and limiting.

Lastly, because I liked the chunky Gatling Gun bullets so much (see previous post) I’ve increased the size of the grenade and R.P.G. rocket. Also added a bit of spin to the grenade when it’s fired.

Getting the conventional weapon set done feels like a bit of a milestone so I’m pleased that’s done! next step – plasma rifle!!

Dev Time: 2 days
Total Dev Time: approx 128.5 days

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Upgrade Icons For The Conventional Weapon Set

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Tweaking Sounds On The DSI Tempest

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Bigger Grenades With Added Spin!